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Recovery Plus your library’s essential reference Feb 2016 29 About the author Before joining Sierra Tucson as medical director, Dr Michael V Genovese MD, JD co-founded Long Island Mind and Body, an integrative practice in New York which focuses on mood and anxiety disorders, insomnia, addiction, and medico-legal issues. He serves as a Diplomat of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology and The American Board of Integrative Holistic Medicine. He was a Fellow in the department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at North Shore University Hospital, New York. Prior to attending medical school, Dr.Genovese earned a law degree and is a member of the New York Bar Association. A popular lecturer on topics such as psychopharmacology, pharmacogenomics, and neuromodulation, Dr Genovese taught resident physicians and medical students at Winthrop University Hospital. Integrative treatment includes all viable modalities. While we cannot cure dual diagnosis, IM can help to heal, maintaining hope and positive growth. Dr Michael Genovese explains. the art and science of medicine. Modalities supported by hard data are preferred to those accepted anecdotally. We rely on the diligent physician’s ability to supplement evidence-based treatment with those backed by the experiences of patients and practitioners but comprehensive, quality care also demands the rigour of peerreviewed science whenever available. 4. The treatment team is open to all relevant disciplines and approaches: no single practitioner can be an expert in every field. It is incumbent on the care provider to cast a broad net and accept help from all disciplines capable of healing the patient. For example, a complex, dually diagnosed patient could benefit from the expertise of a primary care physician, addictionologist, psychiatrist, psychotherapist, acupuncturist, dietitian, naturopathic physician, physical therapist and other practitioners, depending on the patient’s condition. Moreover, communication between the providers is necessary to provide a continuum of care. 5. All aspects of the patient’s experience – physical, emotional, and spiritual – are considered. Failure to consider every dimension of the patient’s experience, including any cultural influences, limits our understanding of the ways in which a patient will respond to a given intervention. Treatment issues surrounding pregnancy, end-of-life decisions, sexual health and parenting highlight the import of this view. Why should I consider an integrative approach? The complexity of co-occurring illness requires a comprehensive, multifaceted treatment model to facilitate optimal healing. Integrative medicine does not exclude treatment paradigms; rather, as the name implies, it includes all viable modalities. The complex, chronic diseases of addiction and mood disorders present a challenge to healthcare providers in search of a cure. Cure implies a single event – success or failure, usually in terms of one criterion or treatment modality – and our medical culture is all too often invested in success at all costs. Healing, on the other hand, takes the onus off outcomes and places it on relationships: first, the patient’s with himself or herself, then the patient’s with his or her practitioner. Healing then can be conceived of as a continued effort to improve wellbeing in the midst of changing conditions and circumstances. The integrative model reminds us that, when we are unable to cure, we are still able to heal. And if we are able to heal, we can maintain hope and positive growth.


RecoveryPlus1
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