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Recovery Plus 64 Feb 2016 changing of the relationships that surround the addicted person, which leaves them no longer supported by old enabling behaviours, thereby forcing change in the addict’s action or behaviour. It differs from the Johnson model, because it is invitational and educational. The invitation is to all loved ones (including the one that suffers from a substance use disorder) to attend a family workshop. It is educational because the interactive family workshop is held so that all participants can learn about the disease, their family system, their family of origin and the impact that the historical family system has on them and their current relationships with everyone else in the family. Another well known model is the Arise model, known as a relational intervention and a sequence of engagement, and developed by Dr Judith Landau. This model integrates traditional family therapy, Johnson Intervention techniques, and DiClemente and Prochaska’s research dealing with motivational stages of change. This model is also known as a collaborative process; from the initial invitation, the process conveys respect and establishes the ground rules for openness. In addition, it acknowledges that mistrust will be a major issue if things are created in secret, and assures the individual suffering from a substance-use disorder that they can trust family and friends. It is important to note that intervention is not a coercive process. It is not shame-based. It is not an ambush or uncaring attack. It is a planned interaction between an individual and a group whose sole purpose it is to modify the individual’s dependence on a harmful substance or practice. It is a process of invitation, education and preparing family and friends who make the commitment to initiate change in their, or a loved one’s, life. The goal is to return to healthy productive living for the individual suffering, and for each of the individual family members. The truth is that intervention is a process founded on love and honesty. I have always defined family intervention, regardless of the model being used, as a process in which you present an individual suffering from substanceuse disorder and their significant others with objective information in a caring way with the goal of motivating each of them to accept appropriate help and/or treatment. It is always wise to remember that someone who suffers from substance-use disorders and their loved ones are blind to their disease (as it is a disease of denial). They need to be motivated in a way that will allow each of them to seek immediate help. The overarching five ethical principles that each of these models hold true are: to do no harm, make things better, respect others, be fair and be compassionate. Historically, the arenas in which one can practice intervention work have been: private practice or a larger organisation. In a private practice setting, delivering intervention as a single service, a


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