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Recovery Plus How can music actively assist in the treatment of addiction and trauma? John Levine links music to brainwaves, while a therapist reports how this helped his patients to recover. My first experiment, Silence of Peace, was tested on a patient using an EEG machine. It was shown that the brainwaves of that patient moved to the alpha state within minutes. Subsequently, a test was conducted by researchers at the University of Cambridge. In a class of disruptive teenager boys, which the teacher called “my class from hell”, the results of playing Silence of Peace during lessons were a drop of 87% in talking and a 108% increase in academic results. And so began the influx of evidence that the music slowed down the brainwaves to the calmer alpha-state, allowing listeners to experience a variety of benefits. In an article published in Psychology Today (16 April 2010) entitled Mindfulness, meditation and addiction, Dr Ronald Alexander states that “Often we cause ourselves suffering when we ache for something that lies out of our grasp or cling in vain to something that has already passed away. Sometimes, the wanting mind involves tightly holding on to something negative: an unwholesome belief about how things ought to be or should have been, or an unwholesome emotion such as anger, sadness, or jealousy”. It is exactly these states of mind that alphamusic is being found to alleviate. A Cambridge-based drug addict in recovery noticed that alphamusic greatly assisted in dissipating the fears that usually would drive her to relapse. Amanda Gordon, a past president of the Australian Psychological your library’s essential reference Feb 2016 67


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