Page 11

RecoveryPlus Workplace

Recovery Plus: Workplace wellbeing News: stories symbolising trends to watch All US presidential candidates talked drugs November’s presidential election to the White House is fast approaching and, as the US addiction epidemic receives growing attention from both public and policymakers, MAP’s 2015 Recovery Network National Addiction and Recovery Survey found that 73% of US voters favour a presidential candidate willing to expand access to addiction treatment and recovery services (https://thisismap.com/insights/press-releases/nationalsurvey finds-americans-overwhelmingly-prefer-presidentialcandidate committed-expanding-access-addiction-treatment). All the presidential candidates foresaw the trend. When Hillary Rodham Clinton, Jeb Bush and Carly Fiorina made inaugural visits as presidential candidates, the first question they were asked was about the opioid epidemic. Soon after, Smart Approaches to Marijuana ranked 18 candidates on their support for a comprehensive, evidence-based marijuana policy. They identified Marco Rubio, Chris Christie and Ben Carson as the best runners, with Bernie Sanders and Rand Paul as the worst (https://learnaboutsam.org/wpcontent/ uploads/2015/10/29Oct2015-SAM-presidential-scorecardupdated for-distribution.pdf). Now we are shortlisted to Clinton and Donald Trump, with opposing views on drug policy, in what could be a brutal clash to be president. How well will these politicians’ words serve their electorate? How much do they understand about how recovery is achieved? Will they play into pharmaceutical interests? With Clinton’s biggest campaign donor, George Soros, pushing marijuana legalisation, will she open the gateway to Big Pot? (http://blog.sfgate.com/smellthetruth/2016/02/16/hillary-clintonsbiggest campaign-donor-supports-marijuana-legalization). More of US workforce tests positive for drugs The analysis of 11million workforce drug test results from 2015 shows a steady increase or a 10-year high in positive results, according to lab tests at Quest Diagnostics. For the 5th consecutive year, the detection rate of amphetamine and heroin rose, while marijuana increased by 47% since 2013 in the wake of legalisation lobbying (www.njbiz.com/article/20160916/NJBIZ01/160919875/greater-number-of-us-workforce-is-testing-positive-for-illegal-drugs). “This new workplace evidence is an additional sign of the rising national heroin problem, this time in the workplace,” said Robert DuPont, former director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Mark de Bernardo, director of the Institute for a Drug-Free Workplace, said the numbers underscore the threat to employers and employees from drug abuse and should provide a wake-up call for both. US drugs legalisation: the fallout Anyone debating the heated issue of legalisation of marijuana and other drugs should first read local facts from the Pulitzer Prize-winning, Colorado-based Gazette which separates fact from fiction: http://gazette.com/clearingthehaze. See the latest figures in Legalization of marijuana in Colorado: the impact (www.rmhidta. org/html/2016%20FINAL%20Legalization%20of%20Marijuana%20in%20Colorado%20The%20Impact.pdf). Doctors explain why pot is not medicine (https://familycouncil.org/?p=14165). Colorado poisoning cases for paediatric marijuana increased significantly and at a higher rate than the rest of the US. Children's hospital and poisoning-centre visits for marijuana exposures rose in the 2 years before and the 2 years after legalisation (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27454910?mc_cid=92cdc763e6&mc_eid=5b742135c8). Support for legalisation fell sharply when California voters learned about marijuana ads on prime-time TV, watched by millions of children (https://learnaboutsam.org/new-pollsupport proposition-64-support-falls-sharply-california-voters-learn-details-corporate-friendly-measure). your library’s essential reference September 2016 11


RecoveryPlus Workplace
To see the actual publication please follow the link above