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RecoveryPlus Workplace

Recovery Plus: Workplace wellbeing 16 September 2016 Coaches, corporates and recovered lives Poor Deirdre (editor of Recovery Plus) – I have been in her ear, moaning about how life coaching is so under-represented in the UK addiction treatment world. And now I find myself having to put my money where my mouth is and not only write this piece, but speak at Recovery Plus conference on 3 November. NOW I have to really consider what is important about this and why I feel it is so worthwhile. I am not an expert in the field of addiction recovery professionals. What I do I do well and believe passionately in is life coaching, and the value it has to bring to the addiction community – and vice versa. I work with addicts in recovery, supporting them in living their life in recovery, free from active addiction. I am an addict. I have been in recovery for over 27 years. In that time, I have done a lot of personal development and therapeutic work on myself. All of this has been of enormous value and has enabled and supported me in getting me to where I am today. I have wrestled with the demons of my past and the nature of my addiction and, in doing so, developed a fascination with the human condition and what makes each of us who we are today. I yearned to study and become a therapist but eventually decided to train as a coach. I had undervalued what I do as somehow “not as good” or as worthy as psychotherapy (and maybe I will still yet one day, embark on the process of training in that profession). However, on this journey as a coach, I have learnt and experienced the value in being coached. It is has brought a whole other dimension to the therapeutic value of all the work I have done and continue to do on myself. I learned a lot from all the personal work I have done – but I was not good at was applying that learning. As a result, I was constantly relearning, not embedding my learning. Coaching holds us accountable to doing exactly that. Coaching has afforded me so many breakthroughs in making the changes to my thinking and behaviour that addicts in recovery are striving to do and is an integral part of the recovering process, albeit a lifelong one. I endeavour to bring all this learning to my coaching of others. My experience, and others’, of being an addict in recovery is it takes a lot of support to keep us in recovery and on that road... truly on it. Coaching lends itself beautifully to the recovery journey, wherever you are on it. As coach, I walk alongside my clients, supporting them and loving them, championing and believing in them. Coaching is a supportive, empowering process. For addicts to be in recovery, it is vital to live a life that is honest and true to ourselves. We need to give ourselves the optimum chance at feeling good about who we are. We aim to reduce and minimise all potential relapse material. At times, this can take an enormous amount of courage. In many ways, it is a radical act to live our life this way. Coaches have many tools to help their clients to identify values: what is uniquely important to each of them. When we live a life honouring our


RecoveryPlus Workplace
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