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RecoveryPlus Workplace

Recovery Plus: Workplace wellbeing 20 September 2016 Let's celebrate lives in recovery While recovery is without question a personal and individual experience, as unique to each individual as their finger print or their iris, there are some common patterns that can be discerned about how life changes following the transition from the chaos of addiction to the relative serenity of recovery. And if we want the general public to acknowledge and recognise this and to believe that recovery is 'real', then we must find ways to demonstrate these common characteristics of recovery pathways and progress. There is now an international movement to document what Life in Recovery looks like. It started in the US – led by Faces and Voices of Recovery – before the baton passed to Australia, then the UK and most recently Canada. The premise of the questionnaire is actually a very simple one. People are asked to describe their own recovery status ('in recovery', 'recovered', 'medication assisted recovery' and so on), are asked about the length of time they have been in recovery and some basic descriptive things. Then they are asked, across a number of life domains – see the two slides on this page – to report the things which were happening at the peak of active addiction, and which are happening now that they are in recovery from an addictive lifestyle. In each of these graphs – the two used in this article as illustrations are for finances and for work and study and there are also equivalent charts for health, family involvement and crime – the premise is simple. More bad things happen to people in active addiction and many of these are put right in recovery. This benefits not only the person themselves, but also their families, their communities and wider society. What the slide at the top of the facing page shows is that this is not an overnight thing, that the longer people are in recovery, generally the greater the improvement in their By the end of this presentation at Recovery Plus 2016, delegates were able to: 1) quote statistics on the financial, employment and educational benefits of getting people into recovery 2) cite the international evidence base on the power of recovery and its consistency across multiple locations, countries, contexts. 3) quantify people in recovery 'giving back' to society, eg through taxes and volunteer work. Click for presentation Click Finance Employment and education


RecoveryPlus Workplace
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