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RecoveryPlus Workplace

Recovery Plus: Workplace wellbeing 24 September 2016 Helping people get to Recovery Street The Greek philosopher Socrates taught us that self-knowledge is the foundation on which all other knowledge is built. Self-knowledge is also a starting point for many recovery pathways. One way of looking at recovery is as a transition from a dysfunctional relationship with alcohol and/or other drugs and other dysfunctional behaviours – such as codependency, gambling, sex – to a healthy relationship with yourself, your family and your community. Have a recovery-oriented alcohol & drug policy in place, particularly if you have safety is critical. 1 in 4 of us will have at least one mental health issue to cope with at some point in our lives. Rather than ignoring this fact, it’s more productive as a company to encourage honest communication, and to offer recovery support and case management of these conditions, and show your staff that you really do care. In implementing this recovery culture in the workplace, your staff will flourish as will your bottom-line profits. Also, in the very worse case scenarios, where a dismissal might be the only option, if you have a case management system in place, you will have collated all your evidence to suggest you went above and beyond the call of duty to support and encourage your staff members towards recovery. Seek professional help. If you learn that a staff member is struggling with substance misuse, drugs (prescribed or illegal), alcohol or another addiction, the first thing to do is to seek professional help in the form of a specialist doctor, a trained recovery coach, an addictions counsellor, or treatment centre, all depending on severity and symptoms the staff member is presenting. Recovery from alcohol and drug problems is a process of change through which an individual achieves abstinence and improved health, wellness and quality of life. There are many pathways to recovery as everyone has unique needs, strengths, goals, health attitudes, behaviours and expectations. Pathways to recovery are highly personal, and generally involve a redefinition of identity in the face of crisis or a process of progressive change. The pathway to recovery may include one or more episodes of psychosocial and/or pharmacological treatment. For some, recovery involves neither treatment nor involvement with mutual-aid groups. Recovery is self-directed and empowering, a concept which dovetails with life/executive/performance coaching. While the pathway to recovery can involve one or more periods of time when activities are directed or guided to a substantial degree by others, recovery is fundamentally a selfdirected process. It leads individuals toward the highest level of autonomy of which they are capable. Through self-empowerment, people become optimistic about life goals. There is a personal recognition of the need for change and transformation. Recovery is holistic: it is a process through which we gradually achieve greater balance of mind, body and spirit, and in relation to family, work and community. Recovery has cultural dimensions: a person’s cultural experience often shapes the recovery path that is right for him or her.


RecoveryPlus Workplace
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