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RecoveryPlus Workplace

Recovery Plus: Workplace wellbeing your library’s essential reference September 2016 25 About the author Clare Kennedy is CEO of Cornerstone recovery services/ Kennedy Street Productions, with her actor husband Kevin Kennedy as co-director and co-founder. The Brightonbased organisation offers free telephone advice, signposting to local recovery services, home-based detox and recovery programmes and a professional advice service to the business sector, including their Discovery programme. They also founded Kennedy Street Community Interest Company, whose primary aim is to provide visual recovery events, an alternative space for people to socialise and a family-feel restaurant. This includes a live streaming studio and web based education/ recovery orientated production company (think TED talks but a bit more Street). Contact: Clare Kennedyaddiction managementuk@gmail.com Clare Kennedy offers basic guidelines, insights and a simple recovery action plan, for approaching a colleague struggling with addiction or a compulsive behaviour. Recovery exists on a continuum of improved health and wellness. It might involve relapse and other setbacks, which are a natural part of the continuum but not inevitable. Wellness is the result of improved care and balance of mind, body and spirit. Recovery emerges from hope and gratitude. Individuals in or seeking recovery see that people can and do overcome obstacles that and they cultivate gratitude for the opportunities that each day of recovery offers. Recovery is supported by peers and allies. A common denominator in the recovery process is the presence and involvement of people who contribute hope and support and suggest strategies and resources for change. Peers, as well as family members and other allies, form vital support networks for people in recovery. Check out 'open' Al-Anon and other 12-step meetings (see mutual-aid list on page 72). Al-Anon is a 12-step programmeme for people who have a relationship with someone struggling with an addiction. You can find helpful information from people who have come through exactly what you are facing. Find a local Al-Anon meeting. Treatment options for addiction depend on several factors, including what type of substance it is and how it affects the user. Typically, treatment includes a combination of inpatient and outpatient programmes – usually depending on severity of use and level of family support, counselling (psychotherapy), self-help groups, pairing with individual sponsors, and medication. If the patient’s family can become involved, there is a better probability of positive outcomes. Self-help groups help the patient to meet other people with the same problem, which often boosts motivation as well as being a useful source of education and support; examples include Alcoholics and Narcotics Anonymous (see list on page 60 of this issue of Recovery Plus). Working with your insurance company. If you have company policy, it would be wise to check immediately the finer details regarding cover for substance misuse – ensure it is not an exclusion. Get quotes elsewhere if necessary. Communicate with compassion but have a plan. Try to speak with your staff member directly. Try not to 'criminalise' or shame them. You want to build a bridge and be helpful if they are willing to receive your help. Remember


RecoveryPlus Workplace
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