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RecoveryPlus Workplace

Recovery Plus: Workplace wellbeing 26 September 2016 Recovery Street (cont'd) that you are dealing with someone who isn’t well, not a bad person who needs to get good. However, being a pushover will not be helpful either. Setting clear boundaries and knowing how you will respond if certain situations come to pass will help you to avoid emotional outbursts. Encourage recovery. If you are working with the staff member's family, be on the same page: communicate with them, encourage them to seek help via Al-Anon and Fam-Anon mutual-aid groups (contact details on page 60). It is important to have a united front when approaching someone caught in addiction. Having more than one message can undermine families' and employers' attempts to be useful. Take care of yourself. The situation at hand is rendered more difficult if you are stressed out and run ragged. Speak to your line manager, have a recovery coach/mentor with whom you can liaise. Take care of your needs and remember the acronym: H-AL T. Being Hungry, Angry, Lonely and Tired are signs that you need to address the basics. If you stay balanced, all will go much better. And do try out Al-Anon. Do not lie or give money to someone who is struggling with addiction. This is a general rule and I cannot stress it enough. If your staff member is caught in addiction, the money you give them will only enable them to continue their addictive behavior and lifestyle. This is a trap that the addict could then use against you or your company. Parents: you have some legal power until your child turns 18. Parents of problem children might be distracted at work because exercising that power in the right way at home is hard. Do seek professional help. If your kid is in trouble, you can 'force' them into drug and alcohol treatment. While some people believe that a person must want to change, sometimes sending someone to a wellvetted rehab facility can be very positive. Online recovery: www.intherooms.com. InTheRooms.com is an online social network for people in recovery and their families. I consider it to be one of the greatest uses of technology. It has over 307,000 members who share their experience, strength, and hope with each other through live, interactive video meetings, personal profiles, direct messaging and participation in recovery-related groups. It is important to get out to meetings and connect with people as much as you can, but I also see the immense value that ITR provides. If you are housebound, infirm, sick, tired, nervous about connecting face-to- face, or enjoy having a meeting from home, ITR has you covered. Another perk to online meetings is to connect in real time with an international contingency of people in recovery from addiction. It is the coolest thing to “attend” an ITR meeting and hear from people from all over the world. More resources: www.helpguide.org/home-pages/addiction.htm


RecoveryPlus Workplace
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